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Book of the Week Book reviews NEW/Random

UPDATED REVIEW: Wintersmith

WINTERSMITH

Author: Terry Pratchett

Ages: 10+ (adults and not-creeped-out 9-year-olds included)

The previous review on this book isn’t very informative, and it was written when I was 11. Writing another one will be difficult, since I have read this book so many times and first when I was 9. I’m not sure what I would say if I had read it for the first time this year. This is just an addition, to get the full story see the previous review.

Tiffany has been lodged with the oldest witch in the country. She is technically blind, but that doesn’t matter – there are always Tiffany’s eyes… Everything is black. She has to make black cheese, clean the black floor and the windows are so dirty that you can’t see the so-red-they’re-black roses. Which will, soon, be made of ice so thin they melt from the pressure of being looked at.

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Book of the Week Book reviews NEW/Random

UPDATED REVIEW: A Hat Full of Sky

A HAT FULL OF SKY

Author: Terry Pratchett

Ages: 10+ (adults included, 10s might find creepy/confusing, but manage. No inappropriate stuff)

As with my second review of the previous book in this sequence, The Wee Free Men, I don’t think I can make this a very detailed review. I grew up on this sequence; I’m not sure what I would say if I had just read it for the first time yesterday. It will help you get a better view if you also see my first review of this (although it’s very short), written when I was eleven.

Tiffany Aching, 11, has left her land for the first time ever. To learn to be a witch – not the sparkly or cackling kind. She will be working with Miss Level… who might have two noses (Tiffany can only see one at the moment) and rides behind herself on broomsticks. But witchcraft isn’t all whizzing around on brooms and glittery spells. It seems to be mostly gross chores. And being teased for, effectively, being an amazingly talented witch. (So, the usual eleventh year of life – plus a few pointed hats). And now she is being hunted by an invisible, bodyless

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Book of the Week Book reviews NEW/Random

REVIEW: The Last Continent

THE LAST CONTINENT

Author: Terry Pratchett

Ages: 11+ (adults included)

The Librarian of Unseen University (home of wizards) is having problems with his morphic field – one moment his usual shape (orangutan), the next a large furry sea shell. The only way to save him needs a person who is now either on the probably non-existent continent of XXXX or over the edge of the world. Rincewind is in fact busy fighting for every scrap of food and water in a barren red desert, avoiding talking giant rabbits and trying not to save the continent this time. Except that he finds gooseberry sandwiches under every rock, and he always ends up falling into the only waterhole for miles. Every attempt to talk with the locals (but not the giant talking rabbit), about simple things like the weather, results in him running away very fast

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Book of the Week Book reviews

UPDATED REVIEW: The Wee Free Men

THE WEE FREE MEN

Author: Terry Pratchett

Ages: 9/10+ (plus as in till you’re so blind you can’t read, my entire family enjoyed it)

The previous review on this book isn’t very informative, and it was written when I was 11. Writing another one will be difficult, since I have read this book so many times and first when I was 9. I’m not sure what I would say if I had read it for the first time this year. This is just an addition, to get the full story see the previous review.

Last week, Tiffany Aching (aged nine) had decided to be a witch. Because nobody likes witches where she lived and had done something horrible to the last old woman they had thought was one. She wants to prove how stupid they were – Roland could never have fit in the oven.

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Book of the Week Book reviews

REVIEW: Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy

LIZZIE BRIGHT AND THE BUCKMINSTER BOY

Author: Gary Schmidt

Ages: 12-15andpossiblyover

Honestly, I’m not sure exactly when this story is set, but I think it is in the early last century. It is based on historical events, and the Tripp family really existed.
Turner has just moved to Phippsburg, where his father will be minister. He has already managed to become the worst baseballer (or whatever you call it) in town, even though he was great in Boston, an absolute chicken and scaredy-cat, and a vandal. But then he meets Lizzie, the first black person that he has ever seen, and joins the fight against racism in the town.

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Book of the Week Book reviews

REVIEW: The Wednesday Wars

THE WEDNESDAY WARS

Author: Gary Schmidt

Ages: 11/12-15 (also a good family book)

It’s 1967, there’s a war on, and Holling Hoodhood is the only Presbyterian in his class. This means he has to spend Wednesday afternoons alone in class with Mrs Baker – who totally hates his guts. And his dad won’t listen because he wants his architectural business a to get a contract with her family. His sister believes him, but she hates his guts to. So every Wednesday, he has to beat the dust out of blackboard erasers from every class in the school or read Shakespeare, and all he time he’s waiting for the ceiling to collapse and release the class’s two escaped monsters/mutated rats. Who even Mrs Baker is scared of

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Book of the Week Book reviews

REVIEW: The Winterhouse Mysteries

THE WINTERHOUSE MYSTERIES

Author: Ben Guterson

Ages: 11-14

It’s Elizabeth’s third month at Winterhouse, the world’s greatest hotel, and she can’t wait to see her best friend, Freddy, again. But there’s a strange rumbling over the nearby abandoned mine and she keeps seeing a strange red mist. Her sort-of-friend Elana, a twelve-year-old trapped in the body of a ninety-year-old, is probably dying. And now she’s hearing worryingly tempting whispers in her dreams in the voice of her worst nightmare – her dead great aunt

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Book of the Week Book reviews

REVIEW: The Secrets of Winterhouse

THE  SECRETS OF WINTERHOUSE

Author: Ben Guterson

Ages: 11-15

Twelve-year-old Elizabeth, newfound granddaughter of the manager of the world’s awesomest hotel ever, has just arrived at Winterhouse (AKA awesomest hotel ever) to find that her best and only real friend, Freddy, has been adventuring with another (pretty!) kind of creepy girl. Who has the world’s most venomous gran. And is friends with the meanest boy/book thief ever, who, by the way, is busy ripping the library to pieces and mugging chefs. At least she’s got a new puzzle – the mysterious, confusing Winterhouse seal

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Book of the Week Book reviews

REVIEW: The Murder at the Vicarage

THE MURDER AT THE VICARAGE

Author: Agatha Christie

Ages: 12+ (including all adults, I’d say)

This isn’t my usual sort of book, but it’s the only new one I could find this week.
I have to admit, I enjoyed it. I must also say that the victim was obvious, but I suppose that’s not supposed to be much of a surprise

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Book of the Week Book reviews

REVIEW: Pages & Co.: The Bookwanderers

PAGES & CO.: THE BOOKWANDERERS

Author: Anna James

Ages: 10-14

I did not start this book with high hopes, but I was quickly absorbed. The basic atmosphere is of the smell of bookshops, mystery and the magic of stories. It is based on the idea that all books have some sort of simple power or magic. (Trying not to break the No-Spoilers rule!)